Courses of Study

COURSES OF STUDY 2014

Art History 108. History of Film: Invention to Mid-Century
A chronological survey of the most significant and influential developments in international cinema from the invention of moving pictures to mid-century. Emphasis is on pioneering directors and major films. This course also introduces the student to film theory along with the major aesthetic and technological developments of the medium. This course has the attribute of Film Studies. (Credit, full course.) Thompson

Biology 130. Field Investigations in Biology
A study of ecology, evolution and biological diversity, with an emphasis on scientific investigations in the natural areas in and around the University. The course, which is scheduled for one afternoon each week, meets the distribution requirements for a natural science course but does not fulfill the requirements for a laboratory science course. (Credit, full course.) McGrath

Classical Studies 101. Classical Mythology
Survey of the principal Greek and Roman myths with selected readings in English from ancient and modern sources. (Credit, full course.) McDonough

Economics 360. Finance I
This course addresses the concepts underlying corporate finance and equity markets. Topics include capital budgeting, capital structure, dividend policy, security valuation and efficient market theory. Prerequisites: Stat 204 and Econ 101. A student may not earn credit for this course and Econ 302. (Credit, full course.) Williams

English 101-A. Literature and Composition (writing intensive)
This introduction to literature written in English focuses on several plays by Shakespeare, introduced by an examination of lyric poems — either by Shakespeare or by one of his contemporaries. The course is designed to develop the student’s imaginative understanding of literature along with the ability to write and speak with greater clarity. It is intended to be of interest to students at any level of preparation, including those with a background of advanced literary study in secondary school. There are at least six writing assignments, with students writing a frequent topic for classroom discussion. A student who receives credit for the Humanities Sequence 101 through 202 may not receive credit for English 101. (Credit, full course.) Reishman

English 101-B. Literature and Composition (writing intensive)
This introduction to literature written in English focuses on several plays by Shakespeare, introduced by an examination of lyric poems — either by Shakespeare or by one of his contemporaries. The course is designed to develop the student’s imaginative understanding of literature along with the ability to write and speak with greater clarity. It is intended to be of interest to students at any level of preparation, including those with a background of advanced literary study in secondary school. There are at least six writing assignments, with students writing a frequent topic for classroom discussion. A student who receives credit for the Humanities Sequence 101 through 202 may not receive credit for English 101. (Credit, full course.) Tucker

Geology 121. Physical Geology
A study of the geological features and processes that shape the earth’s surface and subsurface. Lectures detail major components of the earth and the dynamic processes that generate them (including rocks, minerals, fossils, mountain belts, ocean basins, tectonic activity, magma formation, and climate change). Environmental issues related to geology (earthquakes, landslides, volcanic activity, groundwater contamination, and coastal and stream erosion) are major topics of discussion. Field-oriented lab exercises utilize excellent geological exposures of the Cumberland Plateau and the nearby Appalachian Mountains. Lecture, three hours; laboratory and field trips (including one weekend trip). (Credit, full course). Knoll

History 393. America’s Civil War
This course examines the military, economic, political, and social upheaval of mid-nineteenth century America and considers the failure of antebellum political mechanisms, the growth of sectionalism, justifications for and against secession, the methods and implications of warm competing constitutional systems during the conflict, efforts to eradicate southern separatism, and the lingering cultural implications of the nations’ fratricidal dispute. Students employ the America’s Civil War web site, as well as other media, in preparing for discussions, tests, and research papers. Prerequisite: one history course with attribute G4, including AP or IB credit. (Credit, full course.) Willis

Mathematics 100. Topics in Mathematics

Intended for prospective majors outside of mathematics, computer science, and the physical sciences, this course focuses on one or more important areas of mathematics with emphasis on the creativity and power of abstract representation, mathematical inquiry, and logical reasoning. Specific past topics have included calculus, probability, number theory, group theory, and encryption. Current topics vary by instructor. (Credit, full course.) Rudd

Mathematics 101. Calculus I (tutorial)
An elementary course introducing the student to the basic concepts of calculus: functions, transcendental functions, limits, derivatives, and integrals. Emphasis on problem solving. (Credit, full course.) Rudd

Philosophy 232. Business Ethics
An examination of the moral dimensions of business activity, especially within the context of a democratic society. Topics may include social and economic justice, the nature of corporations, corporate accountability, social responsibility, the morality of hiring and firing, employee rights and duties, advertising, product safety, obligations to the environment, and international business. (Credit, full course.) Peterman

Politics 103. Comparative Politics
An introduction to the comparative study of politics, employing a conceptual or thematic approach. Selected countries political systems are examined with a focus on major features, including their governmental institutions, political parties, and political culture. (Credit, full course.) Wilson

Politics 249. China and the World (tutorial)
Beginning in the third century B.C.E., China began construction of its Great Wall, an attempt to keep out “barbarian invaders.” Since that time, China has had an uneasy relationship with foreign powers. Students analyze early Chinese conceptions of its proper relations with foreign powers, contemporary relations with Japan and the United States, and attempts by foreigners to change Chinese politics, culture, and economy. Readings emphasize Chinese notions of nationhood and the dynamics of globalization. (Credit, full course.) Wilson

Religion 144. Introduction to the Bible II: New Testament (also Women’s and Gender Studies)
An examination of the origins, nature, and content of representative from the New Testament and Hellenistic literature. Attention is paid to issues of critical reading and theological interpretation of Christian scripture. (Credit, full course.) Thurman

Spanish 203. Intermediate Spanish: Intensive Course
An intensive grammar review. Emphasis is on correct expression, vocabulary acquisition, and reading facility. Prerequisite; Spanish 104, 113, placement into 203, or three years of high school Spanish. Students having completed this class may register for courses on the 300 level. (Please note that this class will meet every day including Sunday from 25 May until 8 June. University meal service may not be available during this period. Students will be housed in Phillips Hall and should arrive by late afternoon of 24 May.) (Credit, full course.) Raulston/Spaccarelli.

Spanish 300. Introduction to Hispanic Literature
Readings from a number of authors and periods introduce the student to the variety of genres, themes, and styles that predominate in Hispanic literatures. Prerequisite: Spanish 203 or Placement exam. (Credit, full course). Sánchez Imizcoz